5 Concussion Myths Debunked

November 8, 2022

Awareness about the dangers of concussions is at an all-time high. In response, athletic organizations — from Pop Warner football (a nonprofit program for kids 5 to 16) to USA Hockey — have safe-play protocols in place. But misconceptions about injury — prevention, management and return to play — are still all too common.

Henry Ford Health System"It's great that parents, coaches and athletes are focused on the potential for concussions, but they also need to be aware of the complexities involved in evaluating, diagnosing and managing concussion," says Jeffrey Kutcher, M.D., a sports neurologist who treats athletes at the Henry Ford Kutcher Clinic for Concussion and Sports Neurology.

The best way to get the knowledge you need? Learn how to separate fact from fiction.

Separating Concussion Fact From Fiction

Here’s the truth behind five common concussion myths:

Myth #1: Concussions are only caused by blows to the head.

Concussions happen in response to force. While they often result from a blow to the head, they can also occur after a hit to the neck, shoulders or anywhere else on the body. To cause brain injury, the force of the impact only needs to cause the head to move rapidly back and forth (think whiplash from a car crash or a spill down the stairs).

Myth #2: Concussions always involve a loss of consciousness.

A very small percentage of all concussions, 10 percent or less, result in a loss of consciousness. For the remaining injuries, parents, coaches and medical providers should watch for additional symptoms such as:

· Confusion
· Balance problems
· Slurred speech
· Physical complaints including headache, nausea and vomiting.

Myth #3: You should keep a person awake overnight after a concussion has occurred.

It's important to observe and interact with a recently concussed person for the first few hours to recognize the potential signs of a more serious injury. However, if they are interacting normally after four hours, it’s okay to let them sleep. If you have any doubts or questions, always err on the side of caution and seek medical attention.

Myth #4: After a concussion, kids should avoid digital media until they feel better.

Unless digital activities or screen time significantly worsen symptoms, there's no reason to avoid them. "You shouldn't force people who have suffered a concussion to rest too much — or deprive them of sensory input — if they are comfortable engaging in activity," Dr. Kutcher says. What’s more, taking away activities that bring a person joy or keep them socially connected could end up prolonging their recovery by creating additional symptoms.

Myth #5: All physical activity should be avoided after a concussion.

It’s important to rest for the first two to three days after a concussion. However, you need to be careful not to rest too much or avoid all activity for too long.

Engaging in physical, mental and social activities can be beneficial. But knowing how much to do and when to take it easy can be difficult. If you have any questions, consult a sports neurologist for specific recommendations.

Ground Rules for Concussion Prevention and Management

When it comes to preventing concussion, common sense offers the greatest impact, Dr. Kutcher notes. He recommends starting with these four tenets:

  • Whenever possible, limit the amount of contact in practices and games.
  • Wear proper fitting and certified helmets or other head protection whenever appropriate.
  • Spread contact drills out over time as much as possible.
  • Practice good technique and play by the rules.

Athletes — especially those who play contact sports — should undergo an annual neurological evaluation that includes a comprehensive, focused neurological history and examination. This information provides a critical point of reference for medical professionals.

Knowing the truth about concussions — including what to watch for and what to do if one occurs — is really the best game plan.

Dr. Jeffrey Kutcher is a sports neurologist at the Henry Ford Concussion and Sports Neurology Clinic and the global director of the Kutcher Clinic.

Want to learn more? Henry Ford Health System sports medicine experts are treating the whole athlete, in a whole new way. From nutrition to neurology, and from injury prevention to treatment of sports-related conditions, they can give your athlete a unique game plan.

Visit henryford.com/sports or call (313) 972-4216 for an appointment within 24 business hours.

Bloomingdale Trainer Performing Invaluable Role in Keeping Athletes Playing

By Pam Shebest
Special for MHSAA.com

November 22, 2022

BLOOMINGDALE — If Scott Allison looks bored during one of Bloomingdale’s sporting events, that is a good thing.

Southwest Corridor“Trainers like to be behind the scenes and in the shadows,” the certified athletic trainer said. “We’re only needed in emergencies.

“It’s one of those jobs that if we’re sitting around looking bored, then things are going well.”

But if an athlete goes down with an injury, Allison is quick to run onto the court or field.

In his first year at Bloomingdale, he has found that working with middle and high school students is a lot different than his previous work with the minor-league hockey Kalamazoo Wings.

Treating the hockey team, with whom he spent much of his 22 years, “There was a lot of traumatic stuff like lacerations or deep contusions, overuse injuries like hip flexors or core injuries or broken bones.

“Everything’s acute and fast. It’s a different animal. In hockey, they’re all pro athletes so they know their bodies really well.”

However, high school and middle school athletes are still in a growing phase.

“These kids don’t really know what’s going on a lot of times, so it’s a lot more education on what’s happening,” Allison said.

“Is it an injury, or is it just soreness? You get a lot of kids that don’t understand the difference between aches and pains or an injury. We see a lot of ankle sprains or shin splints because they’re just developing. They’re in that awkward range where their bodies try to grow too fast.”

Bloomingdale athletic director Jason Hayes, left, and assistant varsity football coach Lance Flynn.Allison is the Cardinals’ first certified athletic trainer, a new position for which athletic director Jason Hayes campaigned.

“What we notice is that if a kid’s injured, they’re out a lot less if you have a trainer because it speeds up recovery time,” said Hayes, who also coaches varsity football and is an assistant wrestling coach. “It’s like having a built-in physical therapist on your staff, too.”

Studies support Hayes’ statements.

According to information from The Sports Institute at University of Washington, “‘The athletic trainers know the athletes,” says Stan Herring, M.D., cofounder of The Sports Institute at (University of Washington) Medicine and a team physician for the Seattle Seahawks and Seattle Mariners. “They see the athletes frequently, if not every day. They know when something is wrong. They are medical professionals who evaluate, treat and rehabilitate athletes.’”

The article continued: “Three recent studies suggest that athletic trainers are linked to significant improvements in the diagnosis of concussion in young athletes and significant reductions in ‘time-loss’ injuries that require athletes to take time away from sports.”

Allison sees himself as a teacher as well as a trainer.

“We see a lot more strains or growth issues,” he said. “A lot of it is maintenance and teaching kids what’s going on with their bodies or what they need to do to change things.”

He also meets with parents and coaches to talk about the best way to prevent injuries.

Allison’s day begins about 1:30 or 2 p.m., giving athletes a chance to talk with him before practices or games.

During the action, he always has his first aid backpack filled with the basics: air splints for fractures or dislocations, AED, EpiPens, and bench kits (with taping and bandaging supplies, splints, gauze, ACE wraps, ice bags, latex gloves and other basic first aid supplies.)

He travels with the teams when they are involved in high-impact sports, such as football, and many times he is also called to treat an opposing player if that team has no trainer.

Allison packs his bag for another full afternoon. Allison is a perfect fit with Bloomingdale, Hayes said.

His wife, Kirsten, coached the Cardinals girls basketball team for seven years. His daughter Emma, now at Glen Oaks Community College, graduated from there, and his daughter Bailey is an eighth grader.

“We are a very lucky town,” Hayes said. “We had Doc (Robert) Stevens, who had been volunteering as our athletic trainer for 15 years. He’s just aging out.

“About a year ago, he came to me and said that it was his last year. Scott has 22 years experience, and he has relationships here. To me, it was a no-brainer.”

Assistant varsity football coach Lance Flynn, who also coaches the middle school football team, saw Allison in action during competition in the fall.

“First quarter in a middle school football game, a kid broke his arm,” Flynn said. “My own son, Ryder, was on the varsity team and he sprained his AC socket and Scott took care of him.

“If something happens during a game, they can go see him and I don’t have to worry much because I know they’re in good hands.”

Allison’s affiliation with Bronson Sports Medicine is also a plus, the trainer said.

“With Bronson, we can offer a lot more and expedite getting in to see doctors or specialists if we need to,” he said. “We’re on the same system as the doctors, so we can diagnose and send notes to the doctors and they can send notes back to us.

“If there’s anybody we need to keep track of with the doctors, I can talk with the doctors and figure out how that’s going. If anybody needs to see me, they know I’m here early if they just want to come down to talk.”

Bronson also provides certified athletic trainers at 21 other southwest Michigan high schools: Brooke Vandepolder (Battle Creek Central), Lindsay Aarseth-Lindhorst (Climax-Scotts), Amanda Monsivaes (Comstock), Makenzie Hodgson (Delton Kellogg), Salvador Robles-Soriano (Gobles), Holly Ives (Richland Gull Lake), Katelyn Baker-Contreras (Kalamazoo Hackett Catholic Prep), Lizzy Smith (Kalamazoo Central), Emma Beener (Kalamazoo Christian), Holly Sisson (Kalamazoo Loy Norrix), Nico Talentino (Mattawan), Aaron Eickhoff (Otsego), Quincey Powell (Parchment), Malorie Most (Paw Paw), Jessica Bakhuyzen (Plainwell), Lance LeTourneau (Portage Central), Janelle Currie (Portage Northern), Carrie Calhoun (Schoolcraft), Chelsea Harrison (South Haven), Alexis Walters (Three Rivers) and Natalie McClish (Vicksburg).

Pam ShebestPam Shebest served as a sportswriter at the Kalamazoo Gazette from 1985-2009 after 11 years part-time with the Gazette while teaching French and English at White Pigeon High School. She can be reached at pamkzoo@aol.com with story ideas for Calhoun, Kalamazoo and Van Buren counties.

PHOTOS (Top) Bloomingdale trainer Scott Allison has several tasks as he works to keep the school’s student-athletes healthy and pain-free. (Middle) Bloomingdale athletic director Jason Hayes, left, and assistant varsity football coach Lance Flynn. (Below) Allison packs his bag for another full afternoon. (Ankle-taping photo by Andreya Robinson; all other photos by Pam Shebest.)